5 days | 10-22km - Hotels Every Night

THis route CONNECTS with hotel or similar style accommodation each night

Day 1: Bondi to Watsons Bay Wharf

Day 2: Watsons Bay Wharf to Double Bay Wharf

Day 3: Double Bay Wharf to Cremorne Point Wharf

Day 4: Cremorne Point Wharf to Manly Wharf

Day 5: Manly Wharf to Manly Beach

STARTing at bondi

Bondi, originally Boondi, is where the Bondi to Manly Walk begins. Right in the middle of Bondi Beach, on the beautiful esplanade in front of the famous Bondi Pavilion is where your journey starts.

GETTING THERE

Trains and busses service Bondi Junction Station frequently from across Sydney’s public transport network. Bondi Junction is a short bus trip to Bondi Beach where the walk begins. To plan your public transport journey, please visit www.transportnsw.info.

ACCOMMODATION

There is an abundance of hotel and served apartment accommodation in Bondi. Alternatively there are loads of short term house rental options available.


DAY ONE : BONdi to watsons bay wharf

13.27KM | 490M^ | 3-4 HOURS

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Starting on Bondi Beach, day 1 of the Bondi to Manly Walk gives you some of the best whale watching opportunities of the 80km Walk.

You’ll get your first glimpse of Port Jackson and our iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge from Dudley Page Reserve before walking above the ocean around Diamond Bay Reserve and along the Cliff Walking Track to The Gap and Watsons Bay.

Watsons Bay area is known as Woo-la-ra in Aboriginal, hence the name of the local council, Wooollahra.

After 9.92km, you’ll arrive to Watsons Bay Reserve (and maybe drop off your bags to your accommodation for the evening) before doing the loop around South Head, which offers spectacular views and looks straight across at the final leg of the Bondi to Manly Walk on North Head Sanctuary above Manly. Watching the sun set behind the Sydney Harbour Bridge is a perfect way to finish your first day on the B2M.

The 2.5km loop around South Head offers a few great swimming beaches (one nudist beach) and an area steeped in Aboriginal and Colonial history. Aboriginal Australians from the Cadigal community camped, fished and collected shellfish around what is now Watsons Bay and there are numerous carvings of animals, fish and people on the rocks overlooking the ocean and harbour.

The first European landfall in Sydney Harbour occurred in Watsons Bay on 21 January 1788, when Captain Phillip and his party came ashore and camped overnight at Camp Cove on their way to select the site for what is now Sydney.

For a full history of Watsons Bay area, click here.

Topography

Topography - Bondi to Watsons Bay

Eating

There isn’t much on this route except at the start and finish.

Along Bondi Beach is a plethora of cafes and restaurants as well as a big supermarket behind the Pavillion on Gould Street.

6KM in you’ll cross over Clarke Reserve and Christison Park and with a slight detour, you’ll find the Grumpy Baker and Bazaar Deli on Old South Head Road

In Watsons Bay, there are cafe’s, pubs and restaurants as well as small grocery stores so you can grab a meal and some snacks for tomorrow.

ACCOMMODATION

There is only one hotel at Watsons Bay, the Watsons Bay Boutique Hotel, and a selection of Airbnb options.

GETTING TO WATSONS BAY

Ferry

The F4 Sydney ferry network and Captain Cook Cruises network connect Watsons Bay Wharf with Circular Quay with ferries running roughly every 30 minutes on weekdays from 7:15am until 6:55pm and from 8:17am until 6:20pm and 5:30pm on Saturdays and Sundays and Public Holidays respectively.

The ferry trip takes between 20-30 minutes.

To view the ferry timetable for Sydney ferries, please visit this link. For Captain Cook Cruises, please visit this link or plan your trip here.

Bus

Public buses run frequently between Circular Quay and Watsons Bay park. Take the 324/325 bus from/to Circular Quay via Edgecliff or take the 380 from/to Bondi Beach, Bondi Junction and Paddington.

Tickets can be purchased from bus drivers, except on PrePay buses where and Opal Card is needed.

Visit www.transportnsw.info to plan your trip.

DAY TWO : watsons bay wharf TO DOUBLE BAY Wharf

11.35KM | 140M^ | 4 HOURS

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Waking up in Watsons Bay is heavenly. It feels like a remote, sleepy little town, yet it looks out over a city of 5 million people and offers incredible views of the city and the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Walking through Vaucluse and over the beautiful Parsley Bay Bridge, you’ll pass by Vaucluse House, built in 1805 and so named after the village of Fontaine-de-Vaucluse near Avignon in southern France by Sir Henry Brown Hayes, an eccentric Irish knight who had been transported to NSW for kidnapping a local heiress and attempting to marry her by force. It is thought that Brown Hayes surrounded the cottage, now known as Vaucluse House, with Irish peat to protect it from snakes. It was his belief that St Patrick had ‘so managed matters that no snake could live on or near Irish soil.’

Continue your walk around Bottle and Glass Point, Nielsen Park, Steele Point (or Burroway) and along one of Sydney’s great coastal walks, the Hermitage Foreshore Track. Take in views of Shark Island, the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the grounds of Strickland House along the way before arriving to Rose Bay Beach.

A nice long flat walk stretches along the foreshore of Rose Bay, with the iconic fine dining establishment of Catalina right in the centre of the Bay. Crossing over Point Piper and passing Duff Reserve which looks over Clark Island and the harbour, you’ll walk down to Redleaf beach and the nearby family-friendly harbour pool before ending the day at Double Bay Wharf.

Topography

Topography Watsons Bay Wharf to Double Bay Wharf.png

Eating

There’s a great Café just over an hour into your day above Shark Beach at Nielsen Park Cafe and Restaurant.

For lunch and just over half way in Rose Bay are loads of places to grab a bite to eat as well as a Woolworths Metro on the main strip which you walk passed.

At the other end is the Redleaf Cafe above the Redleaf Pool as well as a great selection of cafes, restaurants and another Woolworths supermarket just off our path in Double Bay town centre.

ACCOMMODATION

There are two hotels at Double Bay, the Intercontinental Sydney Double Bay and the Savoy Double Bay Hotel and a selection of Airbnb options.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Ferry

We highly recommend catching a ferry to Double Bay. It’s a quick and easy way to get here and the views along the way are stunning. The ferry drops you off at Double Bay Wharf, which is right on your journey. Ferries run between Double Bay Wharf and Darling Point, Rose Bay, Watsons Bay and Circular Quay, which connects you to the rest of Sydney’s transport network.

Bus

Regular public buses depart frequently from Double Bay to the City. Bus routes include #324, #325, #326 and #327, taking you from Double Bay to the city.

Tickets can be purchased from bus drivers (except on PrePay buses)

Trains

The Edgecliff railway station (on the Eastern Suburbs line from Central Railway Station or Town Hall Station) is within 10 -15 minutes walk of the route. With only a couple of stops you are in the heart of Sydney CBD.

Visit www.transportnsw.info to plan your trip.

DAY THREE : DOUBLE BAY WHARF to cremorne point wharf

18.35KM | 344M^ | 4-5 HOURS

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The length of our days are slowly building up as we try to jump from one hub of transport and accommodation to another. You could divide this walk in to two days, walking 9km and stopping overnight in Circular Quay where there are hotels in abundance then continuing the next day with a leisurely 8km walk.

Starting at Double Bay, the views across the harbour from McKell Park are magnificent. You’ll then walk through Rushcutters Bay and Potts Point, steeped in history (see below) before entering the beautiful Sydney Royal Botanic Gardens which leads you to Mrs Macquarie’s Chair and the picture-perfect view of the Sydney Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge. Looking ahead that’s where you’re going, straight passed the Sydney Opera House to maybe try spot some seals which sometimes bath on the rocks below, around Circular Quay and through The Rocks before climbing the stairs on to the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

It’s a beautiful walk across the Harbour Bridge and signifies the half way point on your Walk.

Down around Kirribilli, you’ll pass the famous May Gibbs’ Nutcote cottage, world renowned as the home to author May Gibbs who’s best known for her iconic story, The Complete Adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, before finishing at Cremorne Point Wharf.

Topography

Topography Double Bay Wharf to Cremorne Point Wharf.png

Eating

About 4km into today’s walk you’ll be greeted with some fantastic restaurants and iconic pit stops including Harry’s Cafe de Wheels and Woolloomooloo Bay Hotel on Woolloomooloo wharf. In this section of cafe’s is another Woolworths Supermarket on MacLeay Street, 100m off our Walk.

8km in is Circular Quay and The Rocks which has too many cafe’s, restaurants and great pubs to list.

Just over 1km later, on the other side of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, you’ll descend the stairs in Kirribilli to more great cafes and bakeries as well as a water bubbler. Stock up here because there’s nothing from this point until Neutral Bay Wharf area which is at least another hour away.

After another couple of km’s at Milson Park is The Flying Bear then there’s the Hayes Street Wharf Bistro and Thelma & Louise cafe’s roughly 14km into the journey above Neutral Bay Wharf, as well as a supermarket.

You might want to come back and have dinner at, as there are no options around our end point of Cremorne Point, unless you’re up for a walk, a taxi, a bus to the main road through Neutral Bay or a ferry across to Circular Quay for the night. If you do catch a ferry, keep in mind that the ferries only run every hour. Check www.transportnsw.info for more information.

ACCOMMODATION

There is only one hotel style accommodation close to our route, at the Cremorne Point Manor as well as a small selection of Airbnb options.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Ferry

As with all our previous stops, public ferries are a great way to access Cremorne Point, with the wharf right next to the track. Cremorne Point Wharf is a short ferry ride to/from Circular Quay as well as Taronga Zoo and Mosman Bay (both of which we’ll walk passed tomorrow).

Bus

Public bus #225 departs from the bus stop at Cremorne Point Wharf, taking you to Military Road which, with a short 400m walk, connects up with busses that go all over the city from Neutral Bay Junction.

This bus is a PrePay only bus so make sure you have your Opal Card ready and topped up.

Visit www.transportnsw.info to plan your trip.

DAY four : CREMORNE point wharf to manly wharf

22.36 KM | 493M^ | 8 HOURS

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Our longest and most rugged day. This section of the Walk has hidden beaches and long stretches where the sound of the birds and the sea is the only thing you hear - quite a feat when you’re in the middle of a city of 5 million people!

After leaving Cremorne Point, you’ll walk along the foreshore, passing Little Sirius Cove and the iconic Curlew Camp where Australian artistic history flourished. This leads you around the front of Taronga Zoo and out to Bradleys Head. From there it’s a beautiful walk around to Balmoral which is a great spot to grab some lunch and snacks before starting the final 10km of your day.

The next 10km is one of the most well known and iconic walks around Sydney, the Manly Scenic Walkway from Spit Bridge to Manly. This section of the Walk is mostly through National Park and therefore the facilities are few and far between. There are facilities at Clontarf Reserve, just after you’ve crossed the Spit Bridge, then nothing for another 6.5km when you arrive to Forty Baskets Beach.

You’ll pass hidden beaches and walk amongst giant red gums as well as view Indigenous Stone Art with an incredible view out through the heads.

Topography

Topography Cremorne Point Wharf to Manly Wharf.png

Eating

Just under an hour from your start point is Mosman Zu Cafe, situated on Taronga Zoo Wharf.

Roughly 2 hours in you’ll pass Ripples Chowder Bay, an elegant restaurant with a cafe down in front, shortly followed by Frenchy’s Cafe.

About 10km or 2-3 hours in you’ll arrive to Balmoral Beach which hosts a selection of cafe’s and restaurants along the waters edge.

After crossing Spit Bridge, 1.5km later you’ll arrive at Clontarf Reserve which has 2 cafés, Clonny’s On The Beach and Bird & Bear, on the newly refurbished Clontarf Marina. Make sure to stock up your water and use the public restrooms because until Forty Beans Cafe on North Harbour Reserve, 8km later, there are no other food options and only one amenities block at Forty Baskets Beach which is close to the end of your days trek.

For recommendations for great eats in Manly visit www.hellomanly.com.au. There are also 3 big supermarkets and bakeries in Manly.

ACCOMMODATION

There are loads of options around Manly. Visit www.hellomanly.com.au/ to find out more.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Ferry

Since 1855 ferries have been servicing this spectacular 30 minute route between Circular Quay and Manly. Manly Wharf now has ferry services to Darling Harbour, Barangaroo, Watsons Bay, North Sydney and regular services to Circular Quay, connecting you to the rest of Sydney’s transport network.

Bus

Regular public buses connect Manly to the rest of Sydney, heading north to Palm Beach, South to the City and West to Chatswood. For details of Manly bus services, visit www.manlyaustralia.com.au or to plan your trip, visit www.transportnsw.info.

Trains

There are no trains servicing Manly.

Visit www.transportnsw.info to plan your trip.

THINGS TO DO

For a great list of things to do in Manly, check out www.hellomanly.com.au/


DAY five : MANLY WHARF to manly beach (the end of the b2m)

10.72 KM | 240M^ | 2-3 HOURS

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The final day of your B2MW starts in Kayoo-may (or Manly) and loops over the stunning North Head Sanctuary, which passes historic Aboriginal sites, colonial fortifications, beautiful secluded beaches and incredible views including a look out across every step you’ve taken on your 80km walk, directly across from South Head which we visited on Day One.

"7 Miles from Sydney and 1000 miles from care"" - This was the slogan used by the Port Jackson & Manly Steamship Company in 1940 to describe Manly “Australia’s Premier Seaside Resort”.

The famous headland contains Aboriginal rock engravings, rock art, campsites, burials, middens and artefacts. From 1828 North Head was used to quarantine passengers arriving to the colony at the North Head Q Station, which now offer a variety of tours.

The military history on North Head dates back to the mid-1930’s when the main barracks complex and red gravel parade ground which you walk across were completed. During WWII, North Head was one of the most heavily fortified sites in Australian history.

On the way back down into Manly you’ll look back over the ocean so keep an eye out for whales if you’re in the right season, before you arrive to Shelly Beach, which forms part of Cabbage Tree Bay, a protected marine reserve full of beauty and wildlife. A nice flat meander takes you to where the Manly Corso meets Manly Beach which is the end of the Bondi to Manly Walk. Now it’s time to jump in the ocean and celebrate your journey.

If you’re feeling extra adventurous, you can extend your walk by another 30km, taking on the trek from Manly to Palm Beach.

Otherwise there’s lots to see and do in Manly, great places to stay and eat and it’s an easy and stunning ferry trip back to Circular Quay.

Topography

Topography Manly Wharf to Manly Beach.png

Eating

Starting in Manly there are plenty of great dining options to help start your day as well as big super markets so you can stock up on snacks. Visit www.hellomanly.com.au/ for more information.

At the half way point, on North Head, with beautiful views across the Harbour is the Bella Vista Cafe. This is the only cafe in North Head Sanctuary. On the way back down to Manly Beach, tucked in Shelly Beach is another iconic Sydney Cafe, The Boathouse and then The Bower just a few steps closer to Manly.

ACCOMMODATION

There are loads of options around Manly. Visit www.hellomanly.com.au/ to find out more.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Ferry

Manly Wharf has ferry services Darling Harbour, Barangaroo, Watsons Bay, North Sydney and regular services to Circular Quay, connecting you to the rest of Sydney’s transport network.

Bus

Regular public buses connect Manly to the rest of Sydney, heading north to Palm Beach, South to the City and West to Chatswood. For details of Manly bus services, visit www.manlyaustralia.com.au or to plan your trip, visit www.transportnsw.info.

Trains

There are no trains servicing Manly.

Visit www.transportnsw.info to plan your trip.

THINGS TO DO

For a great list of things to do in Manly, check out www.hellomanly.com.au/


DISCLAIMER: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this information, Bondi to Manly Walk accepts no responsibility for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage alleged to be suffered by anyone as a result of the publication of this map, or as a result of the user or misuse of the information provided herein. This information is sources from the public web. Please make your own enquiries as information may have changed. Feedback and recommended corrections are welcomed.